Photo of Ian Scoones, Research Fellow

Ian Scoones - Research Fellow

Resource Politics; Rural Futures; Green Transformations
T: +44 (0)1273 915679
E: i.scoones@ids.ac.uk

CV

Administrator:
Lina Forgeaux

Personal URL:
www.ianscoones.net

Google Scholar URL:
goo.gl/1ltnaj

Ian Scoones is co-director of the ESRC STEPS Centre at Sussex and joint convenor of the IDS-hosted Future Agricultures Consortium. He is an agricultural ecologist by original training whose interdisciplinary research links the natural and social sciences and focuses on the relationships between science and technology, local knowledge and livelihoods and the politics of policy processes in the context of international agricultural, environment and development issues.

A social and institutional perspective is at the centre of his work, which explores the linkages between local knowledges and practices and the processes of scientific enquiry, development policy-making and field-level implementation.

Over the past twenty-five years, he has worked on pastoralism and rangeland management, soil and water conservation, biodiversity and conservation, as well as dryland agricultural systems, largely in eastern and southern Africa. A central theme has been a focus on citizen engagement in pro-poor research and innovation systems.

Most recently he has been working on the governance of agricultural biotechnology in India and veterinary/animal health science and policy in Africa, including projects on livestock marketing and foot-and-mouth disease in southern Africa and the international responses to avian influenza.

PASTRES (Pastoralism, Uncertainty and Resilience: Global Lessons from the Margins) is a research project which aims to learn from the ways that pastoralists respond to uncertainty, applying such 'lessons from the margins' to global challenges.

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Agricultural Policy Research in Africa (APRA) is a five-year, DFID-funded, research programme consortium which aims to produce new evidence and policy insights into different pathways to agricultural commercialisation in Africa and their differential outcomes for local people and economies.

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In the 21st century, global poverty is compounded as climate-related events, political-religious conflicts and growth-inequality nexuses add to persistent forms of social exclusion based on gender, race, and class.

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IDS researchers argue that there is an urgent need to look beyond the immediate, on-the-ground concerns of disease control and containment to consider the bigger and broader questions about international development.

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The STEPS Centre is an interdisciplinary global research and policy engagement hub, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council. It aims to develop a new approach to understanding, action and communication on sustainability and development.

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The next World Social Science Report due to be published in 2016 will focus on the critical contemporary issues of inequalities and justice.

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The question of how Brazil, China and other 'rising powers' may change African agricultural development is critical and timely.

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A STEPS-led consortium of researchers aiming to advance understanding of the connections between disease and environment in Africa, focusing on animal-to-human disease transmission..

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The DFID funded Future Agricultures Consortium is an Africa-based alliance of research organisations seeking to provide timely, high-quality and independent information and advice to improve agricultural policy and practice in Africa.

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This collaborative project, which involves IDS and is led by the Programme for Land and Agrarian Studies (PLAAS) in South Africa, asks: to what extent is land redistribution in southern Africa achieving poverty reduction and livelihood improvement objectives?

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Focusing on the case of foot and mouth disease (FMD) in southern Africa – and specifically Botswana, Nambia, South Africa and Zimbabwe – this research is exploring the economic, social and political trade-offs arising from disease control strategies geared towards promoting commercial beef exports and achieving a ‘livestock revolution’.

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Credit: Panos / Robin Hammond

Narratives of Scarcity: Framing the Global Land Rush

Geoforum 2018 (2018)

Global resource scarcity has become a central policy concern, with predictions of rising populations, natural resource depletion and hunger. The narratives of scarcity that arise as a result justify actions to harness resources considered ‘underutilised’, leading to contestations over rights and entitlements and producing new scarcities. More details

Non-IDS publication

Freebook: Pathways to Health and Sustainability

This is a Free Book available to download from the publisher. This new collection draws on four books in the series, together addressing three themes central to understanding how pathways to sustainability emerge in response to health and disease challenges. More details

Teaser image for Companion to Environmental Studies

Land Grabbing in Environmental Studies

Companion to Environmental Studies (2018)

Land grabbing emerged as a global phenomenon in the period following the global financial crisis of 2007-08. Investors in search of financial returns looked to land across the world, but particularly in parts of Africa and south-east Asia. More details

Cover -  Theme issue ‘One Health for a changing world: zoonoses, ecosystems and human well-being

Theme issue 'One Health for a Changing World: zoonoses, ecosystems and human well-being'

Pholosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 372.1725 (2017)

A Special Theme Issue of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, ‘One Health for a Changing World: zoonoses, ecosystems and human well-being’, showcases work produced by the Drivers of Disease Consortium. More details