Photo of Naomi Hossain, IDS Research Fellow

Naomi Hossain - Research Fellow

Power and Popular Politics; Health and Nutrition
T: +44 (0)1273 915687
E: n.hossain@ids.ac.uk

CV

Personal URL:
https://nomhossain.wordpress.com/

Google Scholar URL:
goo.gl/uYPqhP

Naomi Hossain is a political sociologist with 20 years of development research and advisory experience. Her work focuses on the politics of poverty and public services, and increasingly on the political effects of subsistence crises.

She has researched elite perceptions of poverty, accountability in education and social protection, and women’s empowerment in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Indonesia, and the UK, and led cross-country research in Latin America, sub-Saharan Africa, and South and Southeast Asia.

Most recently she was the Principal Investigator on the DFID-ESRC funded research project Food Riots and Food Rights: the moral and political economy of accountability for hunger Project (2012-14) and a research lead on the IDS/Oxfam GB Life in a Time of Food Price Volatility project. Her book on the political effects of the 1974 famine in Bangladesh, The Aid Lab, was published by Oxford University Press in February 2017.

A participatory action-learning and knowledge sharing programme to improve WFPs gender-mainstreaming practices.

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The next World Social Science Report due to be published in 2016 will focus on the critical contemporary issues of inequalities and justice.

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Researching the impacts of, and responses to, volatile food prices in poor communities in Bangladesh, Bolivia, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Indonesia, Kenya, Pakistan, Vietnam and Zambia.

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Four years on from Irish Aid's landmark Hunger Task Force Report, hunger reduction remains an enormous challenge. This will become more difficult in the context of resource scarcity, climate change, and an increased demand for food in the emerging economies.

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The objective of this research is to improve the prospects for accountability for food security at a time of volatility. This will be achieved through an exploration of the proposition that recent popular mobilisation around food has activated public accountability for hunger.

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How have people and communities experienced recent global economic shocks? In early 2009, the Social Impacts of Crisis project started work in 12 community 'listening posts' in Bangladesh, Indonesia, Jamaica, Kenya, Yemen and Zambia to answer this question.

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Economic shocks in the form of record rises in food and fuel prices followed by financial crisis and recession have driven home the significance of global economic interdependence for people around the world. These economic crises have confirmed a sense of global connectedness at a time of high concern about the impacts of climate change, epidemics, and conflict.

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IDS publications on international development research

The 1970 Bhola Cyclone, Nationalist Politics and the Subsistence Crisis Contract in Bangladesh

Disasters 41 (forthcoming)

This paper starts by analysing the political effects of disasters: a social contract against crises of subsistence and survival. The paper then studies the storm itself, and the politics of disaster management. It examines the impacts on Pakistani political legitimacy and the world's reaction to the events in Bangladesh. The conclusion analyses the subsistence crisis mandate of the Bangladeshi state. More details

This is the front cover to the book 'The Aid Lab'.

The Aid Lab: Understanding Bangladesh's Unexpected Success

From an unpromising start as 'the basket-case' to present day plaudits for its human development achievements, Bangladesh plays an ideological role in the contemporary world order, offering proof that the neo-liberal development model works under the most testing conditions. More details

This is the cover to IDs Policy Briefing 124, 'Delivering Social Protection that Nourishes: Lessons from the Food Price Crisis'.

Delivering Social Protection that Nourishes: Lessons from the Food Price Crisis

IDS Policy Briefing 124 (2016)

The global food crisis of 2007–11 brought about lasting changes to the relationship between the work people do and the food they eat. Real-time research conducted by IDS, Oxfam and research partners in ten focus countries has found the cost of these changes has gone uncounted. More details

This is the front cover to 'Precarious Lives: Food, Work and Care After the Global Food Crisis'.

Precarious Lives: Food, Work and Care After the Global Food Crisis

IDS-Oxfam Report (2016)

This report finds that the global food crises of 2007-11 has brougth about lasting changes to the relationship between the work people do and the food they eat - the costs of which have gone uncounted. More details

This is the front cover to the report, 'Delicious, Disgusting, Dangerous: Eating in a Time of Food Price Volatility'.

Delicious, Disgusting, Dangerous: Eating in a Time of Food Price Volatility (summary)

Report (2015)

This is a Summary of the third year results of the study Life in a Time of Food Price Volatility, which uncover the realities of what people on low and precarious incomes are eating. More details

Thematic Expertise:
Education; Gender; Governance; Participatory methodologies; Politics and Power; Unruly Politics; Poverty; Rights; Social Protection.

Related Programmes and Centres:
Empowerment of Women and Girls; Gender Power and Sexuality.

Geographic Expertise:
Afghanistan; Bangladesh; Indonesia.