Future Health Systems Research Programme Consortium

Future Health Systems (FHS) is a research consortium working to improve access, affordability and quality of health services for the poor.

We are a partnership of leading research institutes from across the globe working in a variety of contexts to build resilient health systems for the future in Bangladesh, Uganda, China, India, Sierra Leone, Liberia and Ethiopia.

After two successful phases over the last decade (from 2005-2010 and 2011-2016), FHS has now commenced a two year extension phase (2017-18), thanks again to the support of the UK Department for International Development.

Future Health Systems - Innovations for equity

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Health Systems Global Communications

IDS is working with Health Systems Global (HSG) to develop communications, share messages and engage with its members and the global community. More details

Future Health Systems Research Programme Consortium

Future Health Systems is a research consortium working to improve access, affordability and quality of health services for the poor. More details

AllAfrica and IDS development reporting initiative

IDS and AllAfrica have teamed up to produce and distribute compelling multi-media content on critical issues for Africa’s future, as part of a development reporting initiative. More details

View all Research Programme's publications

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IDS publications on international development research

Through the Lens: Empowering Women in Vulnerable Communities to Voice their Concerns

Participatory Action Research (PAR) methodologies can help empower marginalised groups to capture and articulate their experiences and concerns to decision-makers. Future Health Systems (FHS) has worked with women in the Sundarbans of West Bengal to use Photovoice – a PAR method using photographs and narrative – to raise awareness of the challenges the women face to access health care. The initiative has led local policymakers and health workers to prioritise, and take steps to address, the issues. More details

IDS publications on international development research

Enhancing Social Accountability for Health Care in Afghanistan

Future Health Systems Stories of Change 3 (2016)

In the United States and parts of Africa and Asia, community scorecards (CSCs) have improved accountability and responsiveness of services. Work supported by Future Health Systems (FHS) sought to evaluate CSC feasibility in a fragile context (Afghanistan) through joint engagement of service providers and community members in the design of patient-centred services, to assess impact on service delivery and perceived quality of care (QOC). More details

IDS publications on international development research

Saving Money, Saving Lives: Community Saving Groups Lead to Improvements in Maternal and Newborn Health Care in Uganda

Future Health Systems Stories of Change 6 (2016)

Future Health Systems (FHS) work on maternal and newborn health in the poorest districts of eastern Uganda has contributed to a story of community empowerment where people have learnt to prioritise, prepare and save money for childbirth. This increases the likelihood of delivery in a health facility, and therefore the chances of a healthy pregnancy and safe childbirth under skilled care. More details

IDS publications on international development research

Strengthening Capacity to Enhance Delivery: Implementation of Payment Reform in China

Future Health Systems Stories of Change 5 (2016)

In 2002, China launched a voluntary health insurance scheme to provide financial protection to people affected by disease-related illness. Future Health Systems (FHS) work in Hanbin County, western China, has drawn on innovative methods from implementation and participatory research to train and support local policymakers, managers and health professionals in the evidence-based implementation of the scheme. More details

IDS publications on international development research

Applying Systems Thinking to Strengthen Health Systems

Future Health Systems Stories of Change 2 (2016)

Systems thinking represents a unique theoretical and practical contribution. It facilitates ways to cross disciplines, and brings previously unused tools and approaches to tackle global health implementation differently. Future Health Systems (FHS) has played a major role in applying and advocating for the approach as a means to holistically understand health systems in low- and middle-income countries, as well as adaptation and scale-up of the project’s interventions. More details

IDS publications on international development research

Galvanising Gender Analysis and Practice in Health Systems

Future Health Systems Key Message Brief 4 (2016)

Gender analysis is an important component of health systems research (HSR) as it reveals how power relations create inequalities in health system needs, experiences, and outcomes among women, men, and people of other genders. Various challenges must be overcome to successfully mainstream gender into health systems practice and research. More details

IDS publications on international development research

Working with Health Workers to Improve Maternal Health Services

Poor quality of maternal and newborn health services in Uganda have resulted in low maternal health service utilisation and high newborn mortality rates, both at home and at health facilities. The support Future Health Systems (FHS) provided to health workers to improve maternal health service delivery illustrates how a package of interventions that equips health workers with the necessary knowledge, skills and equipment, supplies and other non-financial incentives can improve the quality of maternal and newborn health service delivery. More details

Non-IDS publication

Unlocking Community Capability: Key to More Responsive, Resilient and Equitable Health Systems

Future Health Systems Key Message Brief 3 (2016)

Communities are more than a geographic location; they are a site of struggle and also a dynamic engine of change. Unlocking their capabilities to strengthen health systems requires understanding and adapting to local context, engaging a diversity of actors and working with the productive tensions inherent to collective action. More details

IDS publications on international development research

How Can Research Programme Consortia Contribute to Capacity Development in Low and Middle Income Countries?

Key Message Brief 2 (2016)

Capacity in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) to conduct and apply evidence from health systems research is limited due to historically low investment in the field, fragmented funding with a predominance of very small scale grants, a lack of systematic approaches to capacity development, and limited direct investment in capacity development for health systems research. More details

IDS publications on international development research

How Learning-By-Doing Can Help Cut Through Complexity in Health Service Delivery

Key Message Brief 1 (2016)

There is no single solution for successfully scaling-up key interventions and reaching the poor. Implementation research, using tools and approaches that are inclusive, participatory, and flexible, is essential for “learning-by-doing” to understand what works best in a particular context. More details

IDS publications on international development research

Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis Control in China: Progress and Challenges

Infectious Diseases of Poverty 5.9 (2016)

Along with the on-going Chinese health system reform, sustained government financing and social health protection schemes will be critical to ensure universal access to appropriate TB treatment in order to reduce risk of developing MDR-TB and systematic MDR-TB treatment and management. More details

IDS publications on international development research

Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis Control in China: Progress and Challenge

Infectious Diseases of Poverty 5 (2016)

China has the second highest caseload of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in the world. In 2009, the Chinese government agreed to draw up a plan for MDR-TB prevention and control in the context of a comprehensive health system reform launched in the same year. More details

IDS publications on international development research

Disparity in Reimbursement For Tuberculosis Care Among Different Health Insurance Schemes: Evidence From Three Counties in Central China

Infectious Diseases of Poverty 5.7 (2016)

Health inequity is an important issue all around the world. The Chinese basic medical security system comprises three major insurance schemes. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the disparity in reimbursements for tuberculosis (TB) care among these schemes. More details

IDS publications on international development research

Non-Medical Financial Burden in Tuberculosis Care: a Cross-Sectional Survey in Rural China

Infectious Diseases of Poverty 5 (2016)

Treatment of tuberculosis (TB) in China is partially covered by national programs and health insurance schemes, though TB patients often face considerable medical expenditures. For some, especially those from poorer households, non-medical costs, such as transport, accommodation, and nutritional supplementation may be a substantial additional burden. More details

IDS publications on international development research

Non-Medical Financial Burden in Tuberculosis Care: A Cross-Sectional Survey in Rural China

Infectious Diseases of Poverty 5.5 (2016)

Treatment of tuberculosis (TB) in China is partially covered by national programs and health insurance schemes, though TB patients often face considerable medical expenditures. In this article we aim to evaluate the non-medical costs induced by seeking TB care using data from a large scale cross-sectional survey. More details

IDS publications on international development research

Factors that Determine Catastrophic Expenditure for Tuberculosis Care: a Patient Survey in China

Infectious Diseases of Poverty 5 (2016)

Tuberculosis (TB) often causes catastrophic economic effects on both the individual suffering the disease and their households. A number of studies have analyzed patient and household expenditure on TB care, but there does not appear to be any that have assessed the incidence, intensity and determinants of catastrophic health expenditure (CHE) relating to TB care in China. More details

IDS publications on international development research

Factors that Determine Catastrophic Expenditure for Tuberculosis Care: A Patient Survey in China

Infectious Diseases of Poverty 5.6 (2016)

Tuberculosis (TB) often causes catastrophic economic effects on both the individual suffering the disease and their households. This paper aims to assess the incidence, intensity and determinants of catastrophic health expenditure (CHE) relating to TB care in China. More details

IDS publications on international development research

Addressing Resistance to Antibiotics in Pluralist Health Systems

There is growing international concern about the threat to public health of the emergence and spread of bacteria resistant to existing antibiotics. An effective response must invest in both the development of new drugs and measures to slow the emergence of resistance. This paper addresses the former. More details

This is the front cover to IDS Working Paper 454.

Building a Resilient Health System: Lessons from Northern Nigeria

IDS Working Paper 454 (2015)

The overarching aim of this paper is to address the issue of building resilient health systems in the context of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa which has brought renewed attention to this challenge. The paper highlights insight gained from two decades work creating resilient health systems in Nigeria—in Northern Nigeria in particular. More details

PPIB18_FrontCover

Strengthening Health Systems for Resilience

IDS Practice Paper in Brief 18 (2015)

In countries with high levels of poverty or instability and with poor health system management and governance, people are highly vulnerable to shocks associated with ill health, including major epidemics. More details