GLOBAL KNOWLEDGE FOR GLOBAL CHANGE

Photo of Andy Sumner

Andy Sumner - Research Fellow

Vulnerability and Poverty Reduction
E: andrew.sumner@kcl.ac.uk

CV

Administrator:
Deborah Shenton

Thematic Expertise:
Aid; Poverty; Poverty Inequality and Wellbeing.

Geographic Expertise:
South East Asia.

Andy Sumner is an associate of the VPR team. He is Co-Director of the King's International Development Institute at King's College London, a newly established institute that has a particular focus on the emerging economies.

Prior to King’s, he was a Research Fellow in the VPR team IDS.

Andy is an inter-disciplinary Development Economist with research interests in the fields of global poverty, economic development and inequality with reference to middle-income countries and emerging economies. His primary regional focus is Southeast Asia and Indonesia in particular.

He is a Vice-President of the European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes and a council member of the Development Studies Association.

In 2011 he was listed in Foreign Policy magazine’s ‘Top 100 Global Thinkers’.

His recent work on the ‘new bottom billion’ in middle-income countries has been covered recently by the Economist and Voice of America.

Andy Sumner on Twitter

IDS has already conducted a qualitative analysis of the social impact of the crisis in five countries. This research project aims to use the results from a new round of qualitative research to inform detailed quantitative analysis of existing nationally representative quantitative surveys in two countries.

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New IDS research shows that the global poverty 'problem' is changing. There is a new 'bottom billion' of 960m poor people or 72 per cent of the world's poor who live not in poor countries but in middle-income countries (MICs).

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The Evolving Composition of Poverty in Middle-Income Countries: The Case of Indonesia, 1991–2007

This paper discusses the evolution of education and health poverty in middle-income countries using the case of Indonesia. More details

The New Face of Poverty: How has the Composition of Poverty in Low Income and Lower Middle-Income Countries (excluding China) Changed since the 1990s?

To what extent do education, health and nutrition poverty rates differ by the spatial and social characteristics of households? And how has the composition of education, health and nutrition poverty changed since the 1990s in terms of the spatial and social characteristics of households? More details

Beyond Low and Middle Income Countries: What if There Were Five Clusters of Developing Countries?

Many have challenged the use of income per capita as the primary proxy for development. This paper continues this tradition with a twist. More details

IDS In Focus Policy Briefing

Where will the World’s Poor Live? Global Poverty Projections for 2020 and 2030

A ‘double bottom billion’ or 80 per cent of the world’s $2 poor (2 billion people) live in middle income countries (MICs). I More details

This is the image for IDS Working Paper 398, 'MDGs 2.0: What Goals, Targets and Timeframe?

MDGs 2.0: What Goals, Targets and Timeframe?

The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) are widely cited as the primary yardstick against which advances in international development efforts are to be judged. More details

This is the image for IDS Working Paper 394, 'From Deprivation to Distribution: Is Global Poverty Becoming A Matter
of National Inequality?'.

From Deprivation to Distribution: Is Global Poverty Becoming A Matter of National Inequality?

This paper asks the following question: does the shift in global poverty towards middle-income countries (MICs) mean that global poverty is becoming a matter of national inequality? More details

This is the image for IDS Working Paper 393, 'Where Do The World’s Poor Live? A New Update'.

Where Do The World’s Poor Live? A New Update

This paper revisits, with new data, the changes in the distribution of global poverty towards middle-income countries (MICs). In doing so it discusses an implied 'poverty paradox' – the fact that most of the world's extreme poor no longer live in the world's poorest countries. More details

This is the image for IDS Working Paper 392, 'What Do National Poverty Lines Tell Us About Global Poverty?'.

What Do National Poverty Lines Tell Us About Global Poverty?

The basic question about ‘how many poor people are there in the world?’ generally assumes that poverty is measured according to international poverty lines (IPLs). Yet, an equally relevant question could be ‘how many poor people are there in the world, based on how poverty is defined where those people live?’ More details

IDS publications on international development research

Poverty and Inequalities in Middle-Income Southeast Asia

This paper outlines a research agenda related to poverty in lower middle income Southeast Asia, notably Indonesia and Viet Nam. More details

IDS publications on international development research

Global Poverty and the “New Bottom Billion” Revisited: Exploring The Paradox That Most Of The World’s Extreme Poor No Longer Live In The World’s Poorest Countries

This paper revisits, with new data, the changes in the distribution of global poverty towards middle-income countries (MICs). In doing so it discusses an implied "poverty paradox" - the fact that most of the world's extreme poor no longer live in the world’s poorest countries. More details

IDS publications on international development research

Is Global Poverty Rapidly Becoming A Matter Of National Inequality?

The paper asks the following question: Does the shift in global poverty towards middle-income countries (MICs) mean that global poverty is becoming a matter of national inequality? The estimated cost of ending extreme poverty is 0.7% of world GDP (PPP). More details

IDS publications on international development research

Global Health and the New Bottom Billion: What Do Shifts in Global Poverty and the Global Disease Burden Mean for GAVI and the Global Fund?

This paper examines the implications of this for global health efforts and recommends a tailored middle-income strategy for global health funders. More details

IDS publications on international development research

Where Do The Poor Live?

This paper argues that the distribution of global poverty has changed and that most of the world’s poor no longer live in countries officially classified as low-income countries (LICs). It is estimated that the majority of the world’s poor, or up to a billion people, live in middle-income countries (MICs). More details

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