Photo of IDS researcher Amber Huff

Amber Huff - Research Fellow

Resource Politics; Rural Futures; Health and Nutrition
T: +44 (0)1273 915735
E: a.huff@ids.ac.uk

Administrator:
Alice Shaw

Google Scholar URL:
goo.gl/s0wMsQ

Amber Huff is a social anthropologist and political ecologist. She is a Research Fellow at the Institute of Development Studies where she is a member of the Resource Politics Cluster, and a member of the STEPS Centre at the University of Sussex. She received her PhD from the University of Georgia, where her training focused on environmental anthropology. 

Her primary areas of focus include politics of conservation, resource struggles and conflict, environmental policy, rural livelihoods and human adaptability and the politics of indigeneity and autochthony within resource struggles in southern Africa. Her recent and ongoing research investigates relationships among environmental policy change and wellbeing at the political and geographic margins, examines the role of land and investment reforms in exacerbating conservation and mining-related conflicts, and considers how dominant discourses of scarcity and security are increasingly entangled with both scientific framings of environmental change and sustainable development policy. She is currently leading projects on governance at the ‘resource nexus’, mining conflicts and natural resource marketisation in southern Africa.

In a context of unprecedented investment in natural resource developments, this project bridges the social sciences, the humanities and community-based participatory research to ask how different ‘communities’ of actors ‘see’ and experience resource conflicts in Kenya and Madagascar. We use social science alongside a variety of participatory multimedia methods to open up conflict research to more diverse framings and voices, which can offer new insights on the drivers of resource conflict and pathways to peace.

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IDS researchers argue that there is an urgent need to look beyond the immediate, on-the-ground concerns of disease control and containment to consider the bigger and broader questions about international development.

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This study aims to understand and compare processes and relationships associated with the ‘marketization of nature’ – how nature-based commodities and markets for trading them are brought into being – in the context of mangrove afforestation, reforestation and restoration projects in Kenya and India.

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ER210_FrontCover

Violence and Violence Reduction Efforts in Kenya, Uganda, Ghana and Ivory Coast: Insights and Lessons towards Achieving SDG 16

IDS Evidence Report 210 (2016)

This report develops evidence-based insights into contextual dimensions of violence and practices on reducing violence, from multiple perspectives and at multiple levels of governance. More details

ER183_FrontCover

Black Sands, Green Plans and Conflict: Structural Adjustment, Sectoral Reforms and the Mining–Conservation–Conflict Nexus in Southern Madagascar

IDS Evidence Report 183 (2016)

This report is a policy analysis of international investments in Madagascar’s natural resources at the thematic intersection of extractive development, land reform, environmental preservation and conflict. More details

ER148_FrontCover

Green Development, Natural Resource Financialization and Emerging Conflict in Southern Africa with Examples from Implementation Contexts in Madagascar, Tanzania and South Africa

IDS Evidence Report 148 (2015)

In recent years, widespread uncertainty around global economic and environmental futures has contributed to growing advocacy for a global ‘greening’ of the economy involving the coordinated establishment of pro-environment economic policies and programmes around the world. More details

PB95_FrontCover

Understanding Relationships between the Green Economy, Resource Financialization and Conflict

IDS Policy Briefing 95 (2015)

A key aspect of the United Nations’ sustainable development approach centres on creating markets for financialized ‘natural capital’ products, particularly in resource-rich, lower-income countries. The appeal of this comes from a set of policy promises termed the ‘triple-win’: achieving environmental sustainability, socially inclusive economic growth and poverty alleviation. More details

PPIB16_FrontCover

Ebola and Lessons for Development

IDS Practice Paper in Brief 16 (2015)

As the Ebola crisis continues to unfold across West Africa and the international community belatedly responds, broader questions arise beyond the immediate challenges on the ground. More details

Thematic Expertise:
Environment; Health; Ebola.

Geographic Expertise:
North America; South East Asia; Sub Saharan Africa; Madagascar; South Africa; United States.