Photo of Kelly Shephard, IDS Open Knowledge and Digital Services Unit

Kelly Shephard - Head of Open Knowledge and Digital Services unit

Open Knowledge and Digital Services Unit
T: +44 (0)1273 915795
E: k.shephard@ids.ac.uk

CV

Administrator:
Poppy Bardwell

After finishing the MA in Governance and Development in 2013, Maria stayed at IDS and worked as a Research Officer. Her work concentrated on a UNICEF-funded project that examined the views, experiences and perceptions of social cash transfer recipients and their communities in Zambia. Maria built on her practical experience in living and working in Zambia, gained through her previous involvement as a technical advisor for the GTZ.

Driven by her ambition to learn more about social protection and state-society relations in Zambia, she started her PhD at the United Nations University-Merit’s Maastricht Graduate School of Governance in the Netherlands. Maria is now living in Germany near the Dutch and Belgian border, frequently travelling to the Netherlands, Zambia, Puerto Rico and the UK.

To develop an innovative methodology that rigorously engages with the views, experiences and perceptions of cash transfer programme beneficiaries and non-beneficiaries, and also explores the wider social and political impacts of social cash transfer programmes.

More details

This is the cover to IDS Bulletin 481, 'Sex Education in the Digital Era'.

Sex Education in the Digital Era

IDS Bulletin 48.1 (2017)

Exploring sex and sexual relationships is an important part of adolescence, and therefore sex education should have a central role in adolescent emotional development as well as dealing with crucial public-health issues. More details

This is the front cover to IDS Practice Paper InBrief, 'Making the ‘Evolutionary Leap’: Using Open Knowledge Approaches to Improve Development Outcomes'.

Making the ‘Evolutionary Leap’: Using Open Knowledge Approaches to Improve Development Outcomes

IDS Practice Paper InBrief 25 (2016)

The starting point of the Open Knowledge Hub project was our belief that the adoption of so-called ‘Open Knowledge’ approaches had the potential to improve the impact of research evidence on development outcomes and address inequalities in the visibility, accessibility and uptake of diverse knowledge about development. More details