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Centre

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International Centre for Tax and Development (ICTD)

The International Centre for Tax and Development (ICTD) is a global policy research network, devoted to improving the quality of tax policy and administration in developing countries, with a special focus on sub-Saharan Africa. It is led by Professor Mick Moore and funded by the UK Department for International Development and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

The ICTD network at the 2019 annual meeting hosted by the Rwanda Revenue Authority in Kigali. Credit: S Lenz – IDS/ICTD

The ICTD’s primary objective is to provide research evidence that supports developing countries in raising domestic revenues equitably and sustainably, in a manner that is conducive to pro-poor economic growth and good governance. It does this by generating and disseminating research to policymakers and the public in order to broaden public debate on taxation issues in Africa. The ICTD also seeks to build the capacity of revenue authorities and academics in Africa to conduct research on tax issues through research collaboration and training.

Key ICTD research themes

Keep up to date with our work

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People

Image of Giulia Mascagni
Giulia Mascagni

Research Fellow

Image of Jalia Kangave
Jalia Kangave

Research Fellow

Image of Mick Moore
Mick Moore

Professorial Fellow

Image of Rhiannon McCluskey
Rhiannon McCluskey

Research Uptake and Communications Manager

Image of Roel Dom
Roel Dom

Research Fellow

Image of Simon Rees
Simon Rees

Project Coordinator, International Centre for Tax and Development

Image of Steve Lewis
Steve Lewis

Programme Manager, International Centre for Tax and Development

Vanessa van den Boogaard

Recent work

Brief

Toilets Not Taxes: Gender Inequity in Dar es Salaam’s City Markets

ICTD Research in Brief 31

In this paper we examine market taxation in Dar es Salaam from a gender perspective. We do not find any evidence of gender bias in the way market traders are taxed, but we do find a major gender issue that we did not expect – toilet fees. Female traders pay up to 18 times more for their daily...

16 March 2019