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Journal Article

IDS Bulletin Vol. 41 Nos. 5

Forging Ahead without an Affirmative Action Policy: Female Politicians in Sierra Leone’s Post-War Electoral Process

Published on 1 September 2010

In contemporary post‐conflict Sierra Leone, women have managed to secure 13.5 per cent of seats in parliament – without affirmative action in place, thanks to women’s groups’ and coalitions’ mobilisation and activism.

While the political resistance to Sierra Leone having a quota was high, the women’s movement has succeeded in forcing the political parties and the government to recognise that it is no longer politically viable to sidestep women’s rights, should they wish to capitalise on women’s voting power. As women’s organisations, in particular the 50/50 group, continue the struggle to introduce a quota, the challenge for Sierra Leonean women is how to ensure that the quota project is not hijacked by the male‐dominated political establishment. To this aim, this article examines the ongoing efforts to politically consciencise women parliamentarians, society and political parties.

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This article comes from the IDS Bulletin 41.5 (2010) Forging Ahead without an Affirmative Action Policy: Female Politicians in Sierra Leone’s Post‐War Electoral Process

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Abdullah, H., J. (2010) Forging Ahead without an Affirmative Action Policy: Female Politicians in Sierra Leone's Post?War Electoral Process. IDS Bulletin 41(5): 62-71

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Authors

Hussaina J. Abdullah

Publication details

published by
Institute of Development Studies
authors
Abdullah, Hussaina J.
doi
10.1111/j.1759-5436.2010.00167.x

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Region
Sierra Leone

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