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Journal Article

Water Alternatives;12(1): 88-106

Irrigating Zimbabwe After Land Reform: The Potential of Farmer-Led Systems

Published on 11 February 2019

Farmer-led irrigation is far more extensive in Zimbabwe than realised by planners and policymakers. This paper explores the pattern of farmer-led irrigation in neighbouring post-land reform smallholder resettlement sites in Zimbabwe’s Masvingo district. Across 49 farmer-led cases, 41.3 hectares of irrigated land was identified, representing two per cent of the total land area.

A combination of surveys and in-depth interviews explored uses of different water extraction and distribution technologies, alongside patterns of production, marketing, processing and labour use. In-depth case studies examined the socio-technical practices involved.
Based on these data, a simple typology is proposed, differentiating homestead irrigators from aspiring and commercial irrigators. The typology is linked to patterns of investment, accumulation and social differentiation across the sites. The results are contrasted with a formal irrigation scheme and a group garden in the same area. Farmer-led irrigation is more extensive but also more differentiated, suggesting a new dynamic of agrarian change. As Zimbabwe seeks to boost agricultural production following land reform, the paper argues that farmer-led irrigation offers a complementary way forward to the current emphasis on formal schemes, although challenges of water access, environmental management and equity are highlighted.

Cite this publication

Scoones. I., Murimbarimba. F. and Mahenehene. J. (2019) 'Irrigating Zimbabwe after Land Reform: The Potential of Farmer-Led Systems.', Water Alternatives, 12.1

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Authors

Image of Ian Scoones
Ian Scoones

Professorial Fellow

Felix Murimbarimba
Jacob Mahenehene

Publication details

published by
Water Alternatives
language
English

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Region
Zimbabwe

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