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Project

K4D Learning Journey on International Nature

Nature plays a vital role in providing resources and services for human health and wellbeing, livelihoods, economy, climate regulation, global nutrition and food security, water quality and provision, and healthy biodiverse ecosystems.

Humans derive approximately US $125 trillion of value from ecosystems each year. More than half of the world’s GDP ($44 trillion) is highly or moderately dependent on nature. Around 1/3 of jobs in developing countries are directly dependent on biodiversity and ecosystem services, and rural and indigenous people and local communities are particularly dependent on nature for their livelihoods. Agriculture, forest loss, and land-use contribute 23% of global greenhouse gas emissions, but our land and coastal marine ecosystems could provide up to a third of cost-effective climate mitigation.

K4D Helpdesk Report 1006
Nature-based Solutions (NbS) – What are They and What are the Barriers and Enablers to Their Use?
Roz Price
5 May 2021

Who is this learning journey for?

This Learning Journey is part of the Knowledge, Evidence and Learning for Development Programme (K4D). It aims to support FCDO and other government departments’ understanding, capacity and influence related to nature.

Please note that this Learning Journey is currently ongoing so this webpage will be updated throughout.

Learning Journey Sessions

Session 1 – Our relationship with Nature

This introductory session introduced the interrelationship/integration between biodiversity, ecosystems, ecosystem services, human activity, and climate change. It will highlight how human activity is driving ecosystem degradation and biodiversity loss in combination with climate change, as well as the relationship between biodiversity and climate change and how the dynamics of each are mutually reinforcing.

The session made the case that to take action on climate change, biodiversity and poverty reduction, we need to protect, conserve and restore Nature, drawing on key arguments around the urgency and scale of the problem. It will define Nature interventions, which include Nature-based Solutions.

Session 2 – The dynamics of deforestation: drivers, nature, interventions and challenges

This deep dive considered deforestation through four interconnected lenses: one, the role of forests/deforestation in climate change (including emissions, mitigation and resilience); two, the links between forests and freshwater ecosystems; three, global production; and, four, local needs, poverty and development. It covered both the drivers of deforestation and how Nature interventions can tackle it, as well as some of the challenges and how Nature interventions/NbS may need to be paired with other interventions e.g. policy.

This session considered how drivers of ecosystem degradation (e.g. population growth, lifestyle changes etc.), human activity (as both a cause and response to ecosystem degradation), and climate change interact, before examining Nature interventions as solutions. Political economy aspects will be central to whether or not Nature interventions are adopted and implemented effectively: each deep dive will be related to the wider context. Linkages between the three sectors were highlighted. The session also considered trade-offs, governance and equity.

Session 3 – Agriculture, ecosystems, and sustainable land use

Agriculture for both food and commodity production can have significant negative ecosystem impacts. This session will highlight the key challenge of tackling the impacts of agriculture, whilst ensuring food security and fostering growth.

This session considered how drivers of ecosystem degradation (e.g. population growth, lifestyle changes etc.), human activity (as both a cause and response to ecosystem degradation), and climate change interact, before examining Nature interventions as solutions. Political economy aspects will be central to whether or not Nature interventions are adopted and implemented effectively: each deep dive will be related to the wider context. Linkages between the three sectors were highlighted. The session also considered trade-offs, governance and equity.

Session 4 – Oceans and Marine ecosystems: challenges, drivers and solutions

Healthy oceans, marine and coastal ecosystems provide a number of ecosystem services including climate change mitigation and play a key role in livelihoods and economic activities. Biodiversity loss, degradation and climate change are key threats for these ecosystems. Sustainable use of marine and coastal ecosystems is a key priority for the Convention on Biological Diversity’s post 2020 Biodiversity Framework. Conservation, protection and restoration interventions can deliver benefits for people, Nature and climate change mitigation and adaptation.

This session is one of three thematic deep dives that will consider how drivers of ecosystem degradation (e.g. population growth, lifestyle changes etc.), human activity (as both a cause and response to ecosystem degradation), and climate change interact, before examining Nature interventions as solutions. Political economy aspects will be central to whether or not Nature interventions are adopted and implemented effectively: each deep dive will be related to the wider context. Linkages between the three sectors will also be highlighted. The session will also consider trade-offs, governance and equity.

Session 5 – Increasing financial flows and the role of finance in sustaining nature

The global financial system enables a number of activities and trends that undermine Nature. However, it can also be put to work to protect/conserve/restore nature. This session will consider some of the financial instruments that can increase finance for Nature interventions and NbS. It will briefly cover use of public and private investment including carbon credits, bonds, payments for ecosystem services and others. It will explore the changes that are needed to redirect capital away from approaches or activities that degrade nature and towards approaches, activities and solutions that sustain nature. It will look at some of the opportunities, challenges and trade-offs that need to be navigated, explore the potential for unlocking private finance, and examine the role of bilaterals as well as other actors such as IFIs, DFIs, multilaterals etc.

Session 6 – Mainstreaming Nature: institutions, capacity, and evidence

This session will consider how we can overcome institutional failure, create enabling environments for increasing the uptake of Nature interventions, and entry points for influencing the uptake of Nature interventions in developing countries. It will consider both the international scale and national/intra-national scale.

Key contacts

Image of Paul Knipe
Paul Knipe

Research and Learning Programme Manager

P.Knipe@ids.ac.uk

+44 01273 915788

Partners

Supported by
UKaid

About this project

People

Image of Louise Oakley
Louise Oakley

Project Manager

Image of Rachel Cooper
Rachel Cooper

University of Birmingham

Recent work

Past Event

Mainstreaming Nature: institutions, capacity, and evidence

The Leaders’ Pledge for Nature includes a commitment to put nature and biodiversity on a road to recovery by 2030 through mainstreaming nature into all government policy and investments. Ahead of COP26 the UK is working with the multilateral banks to integrate nature across their operations,...

4 August 2021

Past Event

Increasing financial flows and the role of finance in sustaining nature

Protecting and enhancing our world’s natural assets, and the biodiversity that underpins them, is crucial to achieving a sustainable, resilient economy, as well as tackling poverty, climate change and preventing future pandemics. Launched at the beginning of this year, The Dasgupta Review on...

21 July 2021

Past Event

Oceans and marine ecosystems: challenges, drivers and solutions

Healthy oceans, marine and coastal ecosystems provide a number of ecosystem services including climate change mitigation and play a key role in livelihoods and economic activities. Biodiversity loss, degradation and climate change are key threats for these ecosystems. Sustainable use of marine...

7 July 2021

Past Event

Agriculture, ecosystems and sustainable land use

Agriculture for both food and commodity production can have significant negative ecosystem impacts. Agricultural systems are essential for global nutrition and economic wellbeing, but it is well established that existing systems are no longer sustainable and a key contributor of breaching...

23 June 2021

Past Event

The dynamics of deforestation: drivers, nature, interventions and challenges

This deep dive considered deforestation through four interconnected lenses: one, the role of forests/deforestation in climate change (including emissions, mitigation and resilience); two, the links between forests and freshwater ecosystems; three, global production; and, four, local needs,...

9 June 2021

Past Event

Our Relationship with Nature

This introductory session to the K4D Learning Journey on International Nature introduced the interrelationship/integration between biodiversity, ecosystems, ecosystem services, human activity, and climate change. It highlighted how human activity is driving ecosystem degradation and...

26 May 2021