Person

Image of Mariz Tadros

Mariz Tadros

Research Fellow

Professor Mariz Tadros is a IDS Research Fellow specialising in the politics and human development of the Middle East. Areas of specialisation include democratisation, Islamist politics, gender, sectarianism, human security and religion and development.

Mariz is also the Co-leader of the IDS Power and Popular Politics Cluster. Since joining IDS, she has led several multi-disciplinary, multi-country research programmes in thematic areas relating to civil society and democratization, gender, politics, human security, religion and development. She is currently Co-Director of the DFID-supported RPC on Social and Political Action for Empowerment and Accountability.

Mariz has authored over one hundred publications, and her books include: Resistance, Revolt, and Gender Justice in Egypt, The Muslim Brotherhood in Contemporary Egypt: Democracy redefined or confined? and Copts at the Crossroads: The challenges of building an inclusive democracy in contemporary Egypt. Mariz is also editor of Women in Politics: Gender, Power and Development and Co-Editor of the IDS Bulletin Ruptures and Ripple Effects in the Middle East and Beyond.

Prior to joining IDS, Mariz Tadros was an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the American University in Cairo and worked for many years as a journalist for Al-Ahram Weekly English language newspaper in Cairo where she published over 300 articles on a variety of subjects including civil society, women in Egypt and the Arab region, poverty and social justice. She has extensive experience as a development practitioner and worked as a consultant for many international organisations including the Ford Foundation. Mariz obtained her doctorate from Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford in 2004.

Mariz Tadros’s recent work

Working Paper

Energy Protests in Fragile Settings: The Unruly Politics of Provisions in Egypt, Myanmar, Mozambique, Nigeria, Pakistan, and Zimbabwe, 2007–2017

Published by IDS

How do popular protests about the basics of everyday life, specifically about energy, come about in settings where political authority is fragmented and conflict and repression common? How do state and political actors respond to protests which disrupt social and economic life, and undermine public authority? To what extent do such mass protests, often justified as inherently moral struggles over the basics of everyday life, empower the powerless or hold the powerful to account in such political settings? And how do external actors shape these events?

Image of Naomi Hossain
Naomi Hossain & 5 others

1 June 2018

Publication

Christianity in North Africa and West Asia

Published by Edinburgh University Press

This comprehensive reference volume covers every country in North Africa and West Asia, offering reliable demographic information and original interpretative essays by indigenous scholars and practitioners. It maps patterns of growth and decline, assesses major traditions and movements, analyses key themes and examines current trends.

1 April 2018

Journal Article

Ruptures and Ripple Effects in the Middle East and Beyond

Published by IDS

Perhaps more than any other region or any other period of post-Cold War history, the Middle East since the Arab Spring constitutes a significant challenge to established ideas about development and its relationship with conflict.

19 May 2016