Photo of Rachel Sabates Wheeler

Rachel Sabates-Wheeler - Research Fellow

Rural Futures; Cities; Health and Nutrition
T: +44 (0)1273 915759
E: r.sabates-wheeler@ids.ac.uk

CV

Google Scholar URL:
goo.gl/NxU8sl

Dr Rachel Sabates-Wheeler is a Development Economist with extensive experience in rural development, institutional analysis and social protection, including 2.5 years leading research on Land Policy in Albania.  Rachel is also Leader of the Rural Futures Cluster.

Rachel is now a Research Fellow at the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) at the University of Sussex since 2001, and a Director of the Centre for Social Protection since 2006. Prior to coming to IDS Rachel's geographic research focus was primarily in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. Since joining IDS she has worked with poverty analysis work relating to PRSPs, social protection and migration in over 7 African countries.

At IDS, Rachel was the Director of the MPhil in Development Studies between 2003 and 2007. She has published on issues of rural institutions in post-soviet transitions, law and development, social protection in Africa, migration and poverty, and has worked for numerous international agencies, including DFID, EC, SIDA, UNICEF, WFP, FAO, ILO, the Land Tenure Center and the World Bank.

Rachel is a Senior Researcher with the Migration, Globalization and Poverty Research Centre, Sussex, leading research on social protection and migration as well as poverty-migration linkages. She is currently involved in a number of studies that explore understandings of risk and vulnerability both conceptually and empirically and is writing a book on migration and social protection.

Agricultural Policy Research in Africa (APRA) is a five-year, DFID-funded, research programme consortium which aims to produce new evidence and policy insights into different pathways to agricultural commercialisation in Africa and their differential outcomes for local people and economies.

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The European Commission's Advisory Service in Social Transfers' project (ASiST) aims to increase the contribution of social transfers to addressing food and nutrition security. The project gives advisory services as requested by EU delegations. These services include building capacity for the design of social transfer programmes, developing a body of knowledge and supporting the policy dialogue.

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The Centre for Social Protection at IDS, UNICEF Office of Research, UNICEF Ghana and the University of Ghana are collaborating on a set of joint papers tackling topical issues in social protection. These include urban social protection, social accountability and citizenship and ‘cash plus’ models.

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The WFP has contracted IDS to develop a think-piece examining the nexus of food security, nutrition and safety nets and social protection that will support the Safety Nets and Social Protection unit take shape and that will refine the areas of WFP’s corporate and global engagement. This will build on the work of the High Level Panel of Experts on Social Protection for Food Security.

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The next World Social Science Report due to be published in 2016 will focus on the critical contemporary issues of inequalities and justice.

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In 2011 the Ministry of Public Services, Labor and Social Welfare, Government of Zimbabwe (MPSLSW) launched a social cash transfer programme, known as the Harmonised Social Cash transfer (HSCT) for labour constrained extremely poor households. The Centre for Social Protection has been commissioned to design a grievance mechanism and an options paper for responsible exit of the HSCT.

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IDS have been commissioned by DfID to draw from the relevant literature and datasets on poverty, vulnerability, livelihoods and resilience in the ASALs to identify priority, long-term evidence-gaps, and make recommendations on research and data collection approaches and methodologies.

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The DFID funded Future Agricultures Consortium is an Africa-based alliance of research organisations seeking to provide timely, high-quality and independent information and advice to improve agricultural policy and practice in Africa.

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IDS publications on international development research

Accessing the ‘Right’ Kinds of Material and Symbolic Capital: the Role of Cash Transfers in Reducing Adolescent School Absence and Risky Behaviour in South Africa

The Journal of Development Studies 52.8 (2016)

This article investigates how well South Africa's Child Support Grant (CSG) responds to the material and psychosocial needs of adolescents, and the resultant effects on schooling and risky behaviour. More details

IDS publications on international development research

Targeting Social Transfer Programmes: Comparing Design and Implementation Errors Across Alternative Mechanisms

Journal of International Development 27.8 (2015)

An innovative cash transfer programme in northern Kenya is the first of its kind to trial three targeting mechanisms to learn about which approach is most effective at identifying the poorest households while minimising inclusion and exclusion errors. More details

IDS publications on international development research

48 Month Survey: Concern Worldwide's Graduation Programme in Rwanda Consolidated Analysis

This report provides the results of the research on the long term benefits of the programme Enhancing the Productive Capacity of Extremely Poor People in Rwanda using the first cohort of beneficiaries. More details

This is the front cover to IDS Working Paper 460, 'Evaluating the Targeting Effectiveness of Social Transfers: A Literature Review'.

Evaluating the Targeting Effectiveness of Social Transfers: A Literature Review

IDS Working Paper 460 (2015)

Many methodologies exist for dividing a population into those who are classified as eligible for social transfers and those who are ineligible. Popular targeting mechanisms include means testing, proxy means tests, categorical, geographic, community-based, and self-selection. More details

This is the front cover to IDS Bulletin 46.2, 'Graduating from Social Protection?'.

Graduating from Social Protection?

IDS Bulletin 46.2 (2015)

To most people, graduation means leaving a school or university after completing a programme of study, once the learner has acquired a set of skills that is expected to equip them for a higher-income future livelihood. More details

Graduation – how to do it responsibly

24 May 2016
By Stephen Devereux, Keetie Roelen, Rachel Sabates-Wheeler

Thematic Expertise:
Agriculture; Climate Change; Gender; HIV; Migration; Social Protection.

Related Programmes and Centres:
Centre for Social Protection.

Geographic Expertise:
Russia and the Commonwealth of Independent States; Sub Saharan Africa; Albania; Kenya; Mexico; Romania; Uganda.