Programme

IDS Sexuality and Development Programme

start date
9 January 2017

Development usually treats sexuality as a problem: over-population, sexually transmitted disease, or sexual violence in the home and as a weapon of war. The images that come with any mention of the subject are those of risk and danger, disease and death.

This focus well describes some of the consequences of the disregard for sexual rights that exists the world over. There has been a recent emphasis on criminalising non-normative sexuality and a rise in homophobic violence in several places in the world. However, focusing merely upon this negativity generates fear and disempowerment, and discourages us from seeing how we might be able to change our situations.

Rather than focusing on pain, harm and wrongs, a more positive, pleasure-oriented, view of sexuality offers an entirely different set of entry points for work to make sexual rights real. Similarly, broadening the areas within law, development policy and practice in which sexuality is considered is an increasingly crucial area of consideration. Understanding the relationship between sexual rights and poverty illustrates the need for aid policies and poverty alleviation efforts that account for sexuality and examine unspoken assumptions and exclusions.

It is with these entry points that the work of the IDS Sexuality and Development Programme is concerned. We currently support research and communications aimed at rethinking the relationship between sexuality, rights and development and building stronger links between people in different contexts working to realize their sexual rights. Working closely with established networks and movements, approaches to protecting and respecting rights are based on strategies drawn from local communities that are most affected.

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People

Image of Jerker Edström
Jerker Edström

Research Fellow

Image of Linda Waldman
Linda Waldman

Director of Teaching and Learning

Image of Stephen Wood
Stephen Wood

Research Officer

Image of Tessa Lewin
Tessa Lewin

Research Fellow

Projects

Project

Bridging the Gap Evaluation

This is a mid-term evaluation of the Bridging the Gaps Programme a global program operating in 16 countries across all the main key populations at-risk for HIV.

Recent work

Brief

Is Porn the New Sex Education?

Published by IDS

Over the past 15 years, internet pornography has become the predominant channel through which young people learn about sex, not just in the developed world, but increasingly in developing countries too. In many developing countries, traditional gatekeepers of sex education, such as governments, religious leaders and parents, still attempt to keep sexuality out of the public sphere.

21 November 2016