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Publication

84

Prevalence, Economic Contribution, and Determinants of Trees on Farms across Sub-Saharan Africa

Published on 7 December 2021

Trees on farms are often overlooked in agricultural and natural resource research and policy in Sub-Saharan Africa. This article addresses this gap using data from the Living Standards Measurement Study-Integrated Surveys on Agriculture in five countries: Ethiopia, Malawi, Nigeria, Tanzania, and Uganda.

Trees on farms are widespread. On average, almost a third of rural smallholders grow trees. They account for an average of 17 per cent of total annual gross income for tree-growing households and 6 per cent for all rural households. Gender, land and labour endowments, and especially forest proximity and national context are key determinants of on-farm tree adoption and management.

These new, national-scale insights on the prevalence, economic contribution and determinants of trees on farms in Africa lay the basis for exploring the interaction of agriculture, on-farm tree cultivation, and forestry to gain a more complete picture of the dynamics of rural livelihoods across the continent and beyond.

Authors

Image of Juan Carlos Muñoz-Mora
Juan Carlos Muñoz-Mora

Post Doctoral Researcher

Publication details

published by
Elsevier
authors
Miller, D.C., Munoz-Mora, J.C., and Christiaensen, L.
journal
Forest Policy and Economics, volume 84
doi
10.1016/j.forpol.2016.12.005
language
English

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