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Dominic Glover

Research Fellow

Dominic Glover specialises in the study of technology and processes of socio-technical change, particularly in small-scale farming in the global South. He has more than 14 years of experience in research, policy analysis and communication on technological change, innovation, knowledge systems, governance and policy processes relating to agriculture, biotechnology and rural development.

He is currently completing a four-year collaborative research programme that aims to understand the emergence and spread of a rice cultivation method called the System of Rice Intensification (SRI). He is now beginning new research projects with various international collaborators, on Indian seed companies that are entering African seed markets, on rice cultivation system in the Philippines, and on the potential futures of entomophagy – insect-consumption – in the global food system. He is also a member of the STEPS Centre.

Dominic was based at IDS from 2000 to 2008, during which time he completed his PhD on the role of transnational biotechnology corporations in the development and commercialisation of transgenic crops in developing countries. He then worked for six years as a post-doc at Wageningen University in the Netherlands before returning to IDS as a Fellow in May 2014.

Dominic has served as an advisor and editor at SciDev.Net and as a consultant to the FAO and the UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food. Alongside research, he has extensive experience in the field of communication, especially writing about technical topics for non-specialist audiences in the form of policy briefings, articles for the web and live blogging from conferences.

Dominic Glover’s recent work

Publication

Farmers’ Agency and Experiences of Agricultural Change in Rural Kenya: Insights from Exploratory Fieldwork

Published by STEPS Centre

Using novel agricultural technologies to boost farm productivity in the face of climatic and demographic disruption remains a priority for African policy and research. This paper uses an innovative, participatory and ethnographic methodology to explore, through farmers’ experiences, the historical pathways of social, ecological and technical (socio-eco-technical) change that have reshaped agriculture

14 March 2018